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kalabarinabibi
Syntax

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 KALABARI SYNTAX
 
Syntax, simply defined as the rules governing the placing of words in their proper places in a sentence, can be very challenging in the Kalabari language.This is so because in most cases, the order in the Kalabari language is diametrically opposed to the order in the English language.
Generally, Kalabari sentences end in a verb. There are exceptions to this rule.
Let us discuss few examples:
 
Expressing the Noun  + Verb combination
In the English language, object noun comes after the corresponding verb. e.g   He has eaten the food
                  She has washed the plate.
In the Kalabari language, this is reversed.
e.g He has eaten the food = fiye me O fite (the food he eaten)
      She has washed the plate = pani me A sikirite
      Mary saw her brother = Meri Ar In'bere erim.
 
Expressing the Verb  + Adverb combination
In the English language, verb comes before adverb. This is reversed in the Kalabari language.
 e.g 1. come peacefully = dein bara ke bo
        2. she sang melodiously = A bele poko ke (nume) sum
        3  I will travel tomorrow = Ba A ye muba
In no. 1 come is the verb, peacefully the adverb
In no. 2 sang   is the verb , melodiously the adverb
In no.3 travel is the verb, tomorrow the adverb
 
 
Expressing the Noun  + Adjective combination
In the English language, adjective comes before noun. This is the same in the Kalabari language.
  e.g black bag = krukrute akpa
        tall man = gelete owibo
        Wash that red bucket = ani awubia agbakuru me sikiri.
 
Expressing a sentence that begins with two verbs separated by a conjunction
e.g Go and wash that black bag = Mu ani krukrute akpa me sikiri
      
      Go and arrest that thief = Mu ani furubo be kuun
NB: Here the 1st verb (go) begins the sentence and the 2nd verb( wash,arrest)  ends the sentsnce. The conjunction "and" is not expressed.
 
Expressing words that end with the suffix
-able; -ble
In the Kalabari language, there are several ways to express these:
1. Put the words -  na ibim  after the key word.
    e.g edible  = fi na ibim  or fi n'ibim
          laughable = deri n'ibim
         washable = sikiri n'ibim
         laudable = boma n'ibim
more...
 
Expressing "Let..."
1. When it begins the sentence:
    Let  (sng) = Ye         e.g  Let us go  =  Ye wa so
    Let (plr) = O ye        e.g   Let us go = O ye wa so
                                      e.g Let him do it = Ye Or' ani ye
more...
 
 
Expressing "too much" and "too many"
In the Kalabari language, there are several ways to express these:
1. There is too much salt in the rice =
     Arusu me bio fun bakam    ( too much = bakam)
    Arusu me bio fun fun fun  ( tripling the word which depicts what is too much, in this case the salt = fun)
 
2. There are too many mistakes in the book =
     Diri me bio beku bakam
     Diri me bio beke beku beku
 
more...

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